Afghanistan releases 65 prisoners against objections from US

Afghanistan has released 65 men accused of being Taliban fighters despite condemnation from the US, which has warned of them returning to the battlefield to kill Afghan and Nato forces. Read more

File picture from 2010 of the Bagram detention centre. Photograph: David Guttenfelder/AP

#GuardianCam this week: Mark Tran is in Cebu & Tacloban in the Philippines, which bore the brunt of typhoon Haiyan leaving 8,000 dead or missing. He sends this update: 

Gomercino Sayong has been a coconut farmer for 29 years and lives in Camote village near Tacloban city. Typhoon Haiyan destroyed his 1,200 trees on the hillside behind his house. “For coconut farmers it’s back to zero,” he said

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Indonesian volcano eruption claims lives after villagers allowed to return

The death toll from an Indonesian volcano that has been rumbling for months rose to 16 on Sunday after rescuers found another charred corpse and a critically injured college student died in a hospital, officials said.

Mount Sinabung erupted again Saturday just a day after authorities allowed thousands of villagers who had been evacuated to return to its slopes, saying volcanic activity was decreasing. Read more

Photograph: Reuters

Kiev becomes a battle zone as Ukraine protests turn fatal

Wednesday is Ukraine’s Day of National Unity, but the country has never felt so divided.

At least three people have died in Kiev, the first casualties of a protest movement that has rumbled on for two months before bursting dramatically into violence over the weekend. Read more

Photograph: Efrem Lukatsky/AP

South Sudan: the death of a dream

In 2011, South Sudan was born on a wave of hope and promise. A little over two years later, civil war is tearing the country apart. What are the roots of the conflict – and can anything be done to halt the slide into chaos?

Photograph: Jake Simkin/AP

Evidence of ‘industrial-scale killing’ by Syria spurs call for war crimes charges

Syrian government officials could face war crimes charges in the light of a huge cache of evidence smuggled out of the country showing the “systematic killing” of about 11,000 detainees, according to three eminent international lawyers. Read the full story 

Photograph: Reuters

Former Israeli PM Ariel Sharon dies after eight-year coma

Ariel Sharon, the controversial self-styled “warrior” who dominated Israel’s military and political landscape for decades, has died eight years after a massive stroke left him in a vegetative state. Read more.

Photograph: L Kahane/Israel Sun/REX

“My son made his mother cry, but saved hundreds of mothers from crying for their children”
Mujahid Ali, the father of Aitizaz Hasan, the 15-year-old school boy who died defending his classmates from a suicide bomber. Full story.

In the fray, Dr Mohamedi tried to help more vulnerable protesters make their way back up Tayaran Street towards Rabaa al-Adawiya.
At one point, he ran into an old woman who was choking on teargas. “I’m looking for my son, I can’t find my son,” she told Mohamedi, after he tried to help her. According to Mohamedi, he replied: “We’re all your sons: let me help you.” But she refused again, saying: “It does not matter if something happens to me – but my son is my life. I need to find my son.”
So Mohamedi left her there, and headed up Tayaran Street, where he was shot through the inner part of his right thigh. “I saw the officer who shot me,” Mohamedi said. “He was one of those who came from Sayeda Safiya mosque [to the east]. He made it to [the bottom of] Tayaran Street, and he shot me from about 30 metres away.”
At around the same time, Hassanein was also arriving at the junction of Salah Salem and Tayaran, which by now had mostly been cleared of people. On his way he said he saw at least one unarmed protester shot in the head. “I would say this. At that time, at 4.15am, when I saw that guy shot in the head, there was no protester with arms. Some had sticks and wore helmets, but that was it. I swear those who were shot in the head were not carrying guns.”

- An excerpt from Patrick Kingsley’s interactive report from Cairo looking behind the reports 51 Muslim Brotherhood supporters camped outside the Republican Guards’ club in Cairo were killed by security forces. Photo: Dr Mostafa Hassanein with his tear gas treatments

In the fray, Dr Mohamedi tried to help more vulnerable protesters make their way back up Tayaran Street towards Rabaa al-Adawiya.

At one point, he ran into an old woman who was choking on teargas. “I’m looking for my son, I can’t find my son,” she told Mohamedi, after he tried to help her. According to Mohamedi, he replied: “We’re all your sons: let me help you.” But she refused again, saying: “It does not matter if something happens to me – but my son is my life. I need to find my son.”

So Mohamedi left her there, and headed up Tayaran Street, where he was shot through the inner part of his right thigh. “I saw the officer who shot me,” Mohamedi said. “He was one of those who came from Sayeda Safiya mosque [to the east]. He made it to [the bottom of] Tayaran Street, and he shot me from about 30 metres away.”

At around the same time, Hassanein was also arriving at the junction of Salah Salem and Tayaran, which by now had mostly been cleared of people. On his way he said he saw at least one unarmed protester shot in the head. “I would say this. At that time, at 4.15am, when I saw that guy shot in the head, there was no protester with arms. Some had sticks and wore helmets, but that was it. I swear those who were shot in the head were not carrying guns.”

- An excerpt from Patrick Kingsley’s interactive report from Cairo looking behind the reports 51 Muslim Brotherhood supporters camped outside the Republican Guards’ club in Cairo were killed by security forces. Photo: Dr Mostafa Hassanein with his tear gas treatments

Egyptians take to streets as Morsi defies ultimatum. Tens of thousands of Egyptians demonstrate after the president, Mohamed Morsi, criticised an ultimatum by the military demanding a resolution to a deepening political crisis. Morsi said he would not step down and vowed to protect ‘constitutional legitimacy’ with his life