Wonder Woman’s feminism matters. So why would the comic industry reject it? 

If feminism can be re-packaged to sell Sheryl Sandberg’s neoliberalism, feminism can remain one of Wonder Woman’s heroic traits – and a fight for what is just and fair and right. 

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Photo: Everett Collection / Rex

“I’m not the first to say that the best way to counter this sort of misogyny in the workplace – be it harassment of more serious cases of abuse – is to make companies more diverse. The presence of more women at the top won’t be a magic pill, but it’s at least a starting point for to de-escalating toxic behaviors against women and people of color that lead to brutal work environments.”
Jessica ValentiTinder’s sexual harassment scandal is not a surprise. It’s another wake-up call
“From boardrooms to the streets, women’s anxiety to keep our body mass as low as possible is based on legitimate fears that we will be punished if we attempt fully to enter patriarchal space. No wonder so many of us are starving.”
— In this exclusive extract from her new book, Laurie Penny talks about her eating disorder, the pressure on girls to be beautiful and why weight is a political issue. Read it here

Sandra Fluke heard it when she talked about insurance coverage for birth control. Sara Brown from Boston told me she was first called it at a pool party in the fifth grade because she was wearing a bikini. Courtney Caldwell in Dallas said she was tagged with it after being sexually assaulted as a freshman in high school.

Many women I asked even said that it was not having sex that inspired a young man to start rumors that they were one.

And this is what is so confounding about the word “slut”: it’s arguably the most ubiquitous slur used against women, and yet it’s nearly impossible to define.

“While street harassment is just one of many violations that American women endure, its prevalence is a clear message to women and men: there are no safe spaces for women. We need to be able to walk the street and simply be in public without fear. Not just for equality, but because, one day, I’d like my daughter to take the subway to school.”
Jessica Valenti: The end of hisses, whistles and stares: we need to walk the streets without fear
“Do we live in a society that’s simultaneously sex-obsessed and puritanical? Why, yes. Could the United States stand to work on some of these issues? Sure! It would be great if the virgin/whore dichotomy would just realize it’s drunk and go home.”
Jamie Peck: Scout Willis’s topless Instagram protest draws more eyeballs than action
“Men shouldn’t have to look and act like big, animalistic beasts to get women. The fact that women still prioritize brute strength just shows that their minds haven’t fully evolved”
— Elliot Rodger, the Santa Barbara gunman who killed six people and himself found a platform for his hate on internet communities around the web. The Guardian talked to users who knew him. Read the full story 

To dismiss this as a case of a lone “madman” would be a mistake.

It not only stigmatizes the mentally ill – who are much more likely to be victims of violence than perpetrators of it – but glosses over the role that misogyny and gun culture play (and just how foreseeable violence like this is) in a sexist society. After all, while it is unclear what role Rodger’s reportedly poor mental health played in the alleged crime, the role of misogyny is obvious…

The truth is that there is no such thing as a lone misogynist – they are created by our culture, and by communities that tells them that their hatred is both commonplace and justified.

So when we say that these things are unstoppable, what we are really saying is that we’re unwilling to do the work to stop them. Violence against women does not have to be inevitable, but it is almost always foreseeable: what matters is what we do about it.

“Elliot Rodger’s California shooting spree is further proof that misogyny kills”
Jessica Valenti: Attributing the deaths of six people and wounding of several others in Isla Vista to ‘a madman’ ignores a stark truth about our society

#YesAllWomen: how Twitter reacted to the shootings in California

In the wake of the Isla Vista killings, #YesAllWomen began trending on Twitter as people shared experiences instances of harassment and violence against women. See more Twitter reactions